gusset

(Source: youtube.com)

'Family cycling holiday bro?!'  (via https://twitter.com/BrutusWatts/status/522021024716849152)
jtotheizzoe:

Physics That Resonates With Everyone
Chladni patterns mix sound with science
In the late 18th century, musician and scientist Ernst Chladni demonstrated the two-dimensional vibration of a flat plane caused by certain sound waves. Following in the footsteps of Robert Hooke, Chladni drew a rosined bow across the edge of a sand-covered metal plate. When the bow created certain frequencies of vibration, the beautiful patterns above were formed.
When sound travels through a solid medium like a metal plate, certain frequencies will produce resonance. Resonance is the property of a given material to vibrate easily and vigorously at specific frequencies, and the patterns created in Chladni’s experiments represent the nodes between intersecting two-dimensional waves. Every solid material from wood to glass to metal to buildings to our inner ear membranes have a set of frequencies that will cause these resonant vibrations.
Today we use these kind of vibrations to perfect the acoustics of instruments like guitars and violins, and we even see their relatives in the standing waves that underly electron orbitals.
Check out this video for more. Got a violin bow? Try it yourself!

jtotheizzoe:

Physics That Resonates With Everyone

Chladni patterns mix sound with science

In the late 18th century, musician and scientist Ernst Chladni demonstrated the two-dimensional vibration of a flat plane caused by certain sound waves. Following in the footsteps of Robert Hooke, Chladni drew a rosined bow across the edge of a sand-covered metal plate. When the bow created certain frequencies of vibration, the beautiful patterns above were formed.

When sound travels through a solid medium like a metal plate, certain frequencies will produce resonance. Resonance is the property of a given material to vibrate easily and vigorously at specific frequencies, and the patterns created in Chladni’s experiments represent the nodes between intersecting two-dimensional waves. Every solid material from wood to glass to metal to buildings to our inner ear membranes have a set of frequencies that will cause these resonant vibrations.

Today we use these kind of vibrations to perfect the acoustics of instruments like guitars and violins, and we even see their relatives in the standing waves that underly electron orbitals.

Check out this video for more. Got a violin bow? Try it yourself!

(via BBC - Podcasts and Downloads - Boston Calling)

"The first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States has died. Now, at least one African immigrant is finding herself on the defensive. We’ll meet that young Liberian-American, and learn how she’s trying to remain focused on the crisis back home. Also on this edition, another immigrant recalls some early fashion lessons from her teenage class-mates. And, we’ll hear from you—our listeners—about whether the world is actually becoming a more peaceful place. Plus, a trip to Alcatraz Island to tour an unprecedented new exhibit by the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. We’ll learn how English became the language of science. And— from the Beyonce horse fly to the George Bush beetle—we’ll find out how new species get their familiar names."

13MB MP3: http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/worldservice/boston/boston_20141011-0530a.mp3

(via BBC - Podcasts and Downloads - Boston Calling)

"The first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States has died. Now, at least one African immigrant is finding herself on the defensive. We’ll meet that young Liberian-American, and learn how she’s trying to remain focused on the crisis back home. Also on this edition, another immigrant recalls some early fashion lessons from her teenage class-mates. And, we’ll hear from you—our listeners—about whether the world is actually becoming a more peaceful place. Plus, a trip to Alcatraz Island to tour an unprecedented new exhibit by the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. We’ll learn how English became the language of science. And— from the Beyonce horse fly to the George Bush beetle—we’ll find out how new species get their familiar names."

13MB MP3: http://downloads.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/worldservice/boston/boston_20141011-0530a.mp3

'Nah, nah mate. I think you've got your wires crossed!'  (via https://twitter.com/BrutusWatts/status/521966593082159104)

'Nah, nah mate. I think you've got your wires crossed!' (via https://twitter.com/BrutusWatts/status/521966593082159104)

(via BBC Academy - Technology - Digitising the BBC archive)

Click through for video. 
[possibly UK only]

(via BBC Academy - Technology - Digitising the BBC archive)

Click through for video.
[possibly UK only]

(Source: youtube.com)

(Source: vimeo.com)